Monterey Audubon's Monthly Lectures and Programs Occur at the PG Museum of Natural History on Forest Avenue in Pacific Grove. Doors open for refreshments and socializing at 700pm. Our programs begin at app. 7:30. Monterey Audubon's Board Meetings are also open to the general membership and begin at 6:00pm, before the presentation. All are welcome

TUESDAY, MARCH 12: Birding Thailand: Specialties of Southeast Asia and the Spectacle of Asian Migration with Brian Sullivan and/or Paul Fenwick

An Ultramarine Flycatcher, a beautiful Thai representative of the Old World Flycatcher family. (c) BL Sullivan

An Ultramarine Flycatcher, a beautiful Thai representative of the Old World Flycatcher family. (c) BL Sullivan

Known throughout the world for its beaches, cuisine, and tourist hordes, Thailand also boasts an impressive roster of both resident and migratory bird species. From Pittas and Cupwings in shady tropical forests, to sprawling migratory flights of Black Baza - a stunning species of raptor -, to wintering flocks of fast disappearing shorebirds, Thailand has birds to satisfy the niche appetite of any traveling birder. Locals Brian Sullivan of eBird and Cornell Lab fame and Paul Fenwick, VP of Monterey Audubon traveled to Thailand in November 2018 to try and witness the spectacle of Thailand’s diversity and succeeded beyond their expectations. And, of course, they returned with plenty of stunning images and tales to tell.

A Brown Creeper sings. By Aaron Maizlish

A Brown Creeper sings. By Aaron Maizlish

TUESDAY, APRIL 9: Bird Language with Jeff Caplan
The expression “A little birdie told me…” is a familiar cultural idiom. But have you ever stopped to wonder what the “little birdies” are actually saying? Join our special guest Jeff Caplan to find out! Jeff weaves together 30 years as a naturalist and a teacher of communication skills to learn a common language for understanding and connecting more deeply to birds and nature in Santa Cruz, CA. Birds build their families, and keep themselves alive through their songs, calls and body language. Research is showing that bird language may contain the roots of the evolution of human language. By learning to interpret bird songs, sounds and movements we can begin to develop a deeper connection with birds and what they see and know. Please also consider joining Jeff to celebrate Earth Day in Santa Cruz later in April: Get more info on his Earthday Bird Language+Brunch class in Santa Cruz on April 20, 2019.

Black-footed Albatrosses breeding on Midway often visit Monterey Bay

Black-footed Albatrosses breeding on Midway often visit Monterey Bay

TUESDAY, MAY 14: Birds and Bird Conservation on Midway Atoll with Jan Loomis
Jan Loomis went to Midway Atoll to have an adventure and be surrounded by the seabirds she had recently fallen in love with on their nesting grounds. As a new member of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Annual Nesting Albatross Census Team she came to know all things Albatross.

 Jan’s background and profession is nursing, specifically, emergency and travel nursing. She has worked for thirty plus years to keep everyday travelers (including birders!), as well as members of the Department of Defense, foreign governments and Homeland Security from contracting diseases while away on foreign assignments and travel. Immediately after Hurricane Katrina Jan deployed to the New Orleans Airport where as the Triage Team Leader she treated over 3500 patients in just seven days.

Locally, Jan is about to start her second year as part of the Central Coast Black Oystercatcher Monitoring Project and also works as a volunteer naturalist for the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary.

 While her main job on Midway was to census nesting birds, Jan’s training as an observer and emergency responder would not allow her to ignore the twin slow moving crises of climate change and plastic pollution that were impacting a breeding colony of birds on one of the most remote islands on the planet. In her talk she will describe her work on Midway and give her assessment of the situation and prescription for continued good health of the colony.

A Black Oystercatcher in Pacific Grove

A Black Oystercatcher in Pacific Grove

 TUESDAY, JULY 9: Black Oystercatchers and Sea Level Rise in Pacific Grove, California with Amanda Preece and Rahil Ryder
Amanda and Rahil will discuss their work on the effects of sea level rise on the availability of Black Oystercatcher habitat in Pacific Grove, CA. Both masters students at CSUMB, Amanda and Rahil took on the challenging topic of sea level rise for their Remote Sensing class, in which satellite imagery or other remotely sensed data is used to answer specific ecological questions. They used ArcGIS in conjunction with NOAA's sea level rise projections, plus additional help from our local Black Oystercatcher Monitoring Project, to develop maps that indicate which sections of the oystercatcher territories are at risk from sea level rise.