Monterey Audubon's Monthly Lectures and Programs Occur at the PG Museum of Natural History on Forest Avenue in Pacific Grove. Doors open for refreshments and socializing at 700pm. Our programs begin at app. 7:30. Monterey Audubon's Board Meetings are also open to the general membership and begin at 6:00pm, before the presentation. All are welcome

TUESDAY, JANUARY 8 California’s Coast: Living on the Edge. With Kim Steinhardt

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Join environmental writer and marine wildlife photographer Kim Steinhardt for an inspiring talk and photographic journey into the past, present, and probable future of California’s coast. Part art, part science, part law, this unique evening’s adventure features cautionary tales and colorful personal anecdotes based on a lifetime growing up along the shoreline. You will also hear the latest news of threats to the endangered California sea otter, the policy challenges posed by sea-level rise and proposals to do away with the Endangered Species Act, and more, drawn from his recent book exploring the sometimes-complex relationship between humans and nature (The Edge: The Pressured Past and Precarious Future of California’s Coast, co-authored with noted coastal science expert Dr. Gary Griggs).

Recognized as a “keen observer and a wonderful storyteller,” Mr. Steinhardt has served as a photo contributor and advisor to National Geographic’s Explore My Worldseries, and his photographic work also appears in other books, publications, and on TV. He is a former administrative law judge who also teaches law courses on legislation, emphasizing ocean protection and advocacy. Mr. Steinhardt is president of the board of directors at UC Santa Cruz’ Friends of the Seymour Marine Discovery Center. 

TUESDAY FEBRUARY 12 California Brown Pelicans: A Cause for Conservation Optimism or Concern? With Audubon California Seabird Program Director, Anna Weinstein

A young Brown Pelican passing Point Pinos in autumn, 2018. Photo (c) B. Matheson

A young Brown Pelican passing Point Pinos in autumn, 2018. Photo (c) B. Matheson

This past spring and summer, unusual numbers of young brown pelicans turned up in parking lots, college graduations ceremonies, and streets from Oregon through California. Does this mean our California Brown Pelican subspecies is in trouble? For several years Audubon California with the help of Audubon Chapters, like Monterey Audubon, has been coordinating narrowly focused Brown Pelican counts to try and determine the real population demographics of this iconic and familiar species. Join Audubon Seabird Program Director Anna Weinstein for an important overview of how these beloved birds are really faring in 2019.

TUESDAY, MARCH 12: Birding Thailand: Specialties of Southeast Asia and the Spectacle of Asian Migration with Brian Sullivan and/or Paul Fenwick

An Ultramarine Flycatcher, a beautiful Thai representative of the Old World Flycatcher family. (c) BL Sullivan

An Ultramarine Flycatcher, a beautiful Thai representative of the Old World Flycatcher family. (c) BL Sullivan

Known throughout the world for its beaches, cuisine, and tourist hordes, Thailand also boasts an impressive roster of both resident and migratory bird species. From Pittas and Cupwings in shady tropical forests, to sprawling migratory flights of Black Baza - a stunning species of raptor -, to wintering flocks of fast disappearing shorebirds, Thailand has birds to satisfy the niche appetite of any traveling birder. Locals Brian Sullivan of eBird and Cornell Lab fame and Paul Fenwick, VP of Monterey Audubon traveled to Thailand in November 2018 to try and witness the spectacle of Thailand’s diversity and succeeded beyond their expectations. And, of course, they returned with plenty of stunning images and tales to tell.

A Brown Creeper sings out. By Aaron Maizlish

A Brown Creeper sings out. By Aaron Maizlish

TUESDAY, APRIL 9: Bird Language with Jeff Caplan
The expression “A little birdie told me…” is a familiar cultural idiom. But have you ever stopped to wonder what the “little birdies” are actually saying? Join our special guest Jeff Caplan to find out! Jeff weaves together 30 years as a naturalist and a teacher of communication skills to learn a common language for understanding and connecting more deeply to birds and nature in Santa Cruz, CA. Birds build their families, and keep themselves alive through their songs, calls and body language. Research is showing that bird language may contain the roots of the evolution of human language. By learning to interpret bird songs, sounds and movements we can begin to develop a deeper connection with birds and what they see and know.