Monterey Audubon: Calendar of Events

  Monterey Audubon Vice President and Banding Project Coordinator Shawn Wagoner with an Oak Tit Mouse near Toro Creek

Monterey Audubon Vice President and Banding Project Coordinator Shawn Wagoner with an Oak Tit Mouse near Toro Creek

TUES., MAY 8 LECTURE–Banding the Birds of Fort Ord National Monument. In partnership with Ventana Wildlife Society and Bureau of Land Management, Monterey Audubon established a bird banding station at the Toro Creek area of Fort Ord National Monument in spring 2017. Bird banding is a great way to monitor bird populations and get the community involved with conservation. We successfully completed our first year of operation in 2017 and we are looking forward to continuing in 2018. Monterey Audubon’s Shawn Wagoner will talk about the first year of the banding station with photos and insights on the banding process. Please join us for this interesting topic and to see birds in a different perspective.

Monterey Audubon's Monthly Lectures and Programs Occur at the PG Museum of Natural History on Forest Avenue in Pacific Grove. Doors open for refreshments and socializing at 700pm. Our programs begin at app. 7:30. Monterey Audubon's Board Meetings are also open to the general membership and begin at 6:00pm, before the presentation.

  A golden eagle, a scarce but regular visitor to the oak grasslands around Elkhorn Slough

A golden eagle, a scarce but regular visitor to the oak grasslands around Elkhorn Slough

FIRST SATURDAY OF EACH MONTH: FIELD TRIPS (March 3, April 7, May 5, and June 2) – Elkhorn Slough Reserve: Start out the first weekend of every month with a bird walk around the Elkhorn Slough watershed. Depending on timing and conditions, we'll explore one or several areas within the watershed, such as the Reserve proper, Kirby Park, Moonglow Dairy, Moss Landing State Beach and Harbor, and Zmudowski State Beach. We’ll traverse these areas looking for resident and migrant birds that utilize this dynamic ecosystem. Meet at the Elkhorn Slough Visitors Center, 1700 Elkhorn Road, Castroville, CA 95076. The walk starts at 8:30 a.m. sharp. No RSVP needed. Contact Rick Fournier, 831-633-0572, or the reserve office (831-728-2822) for questions.

  The Glaucous Gull: A youngster in its first winter, visiting the rocky shore at Pebble Beach. Glaucous Gulls are a rare but regular visitor from the arctic north in winter. Photo by Blake Matheson, Lecturer. 

The Glaucous Gull: A youngster in its first winter, visiting the rocky shore at Pebble Beach. Glaucous Gulls are a rare but regular visitor from the arctic north in winter. Photo by Blake Matheson, Lecturer. 

TUES. JUNE 12, LECTURE- The Gulls of Monterey Bay with Blake Matheson. Few groups of birds inspire such strong feelings as the Gulls, or Larids. To many non-birders these birds are a pestilence, nesting on roof tops, stealing french fries of restaurant decks and pirating the catches of many a commercial fisherman. To birders of all levels, they present a mind-boggling identification challenge. Join MAS President and noted "larophile" Blake Matheson for an overview of these birds within the context of Monterey Bay: how to find them, identify them, and in some cases, defend them from an indifferent or hostile human community. 

Monterey Audubon's Monthly Lectures and Programs Occur at the PG Museum of Natural History on Forest Avenue in Pacific Grove. Doors open for refreshments and socializing at 700pm. Our programs begin at app. 7:30. Monterey Audubon's Board Meetings are also open to the general membership and begin at 6:00pm, before the presentation.

  Western Kingbird: a common breeding resident of Monterey County's arid interior. Photo by Jamie Chavez

Western Kingbird: a common breeding resident of Monterey County's arid interior. Photo by Jamie Chavez

SAT. JUNE 23, FIELD TRIP- San Lorenzo Regional Park, near King City. For those who live and bird regularly on the coast, a trip to interior Monterey during the breeding season can be eye-opening. Birds that seem like scarce gems on the coast: White-breasted Nuthatch, Bullock's Oriole, and Western Kingbirds become downright commonplace as one ventures into the upper reaches of the Salinas River Valley. Hence our inspiration to plan a trip to an under-explored gem of Southern Monterey County, San Lorenzo Regional Park. We'll carpool from the Laureles Grade Park and Ride at 7:00, and bird the park from around 8:00/8:30 until lunch time. RSVP to Amanda Preece at apreece24@gmail.com or (208) 520-8794.

  The Perija Brush-Finch, one of the Colombian specialty species that stand to benefit from stronger conservation incentives in northern Columbia. Photo by Andres Cuervo

The Perija Brush-Finch, one of the Colombian specialty species that stand to benefit from stronger conservation incentives in northern Columbia. Photo by Andres Cuervo

TUES. JULY 10, LECTURE: Birding to Save Colombia's Birds, with Alvaro Jaramillo. Many birders have heard that Colombia is the most bird-rich nation on Earth! So why is it not full of birders? It’s on an incredible upswing, coming out of a decades-long conflict, political as well as the illegal drug trade. Those days are becoming history. The country has gone through a sharp turnaround turnaround in regards to travelers’ safety. The birding is astounding, and there are some wonderfully unique spots to visit. Among these is the Santa Marta mountain range, separate from the Andes, that has an incredible level of endemism—species that cannot be found anywhere else on Earth. Santa Marta, the nearby dry forests, the coastal desert, and the Perijá Mountains to the east make northern Colombia an amazing way to begin to dip your toes in the unbelievable birdlife of this country. Then there are the three different ranges of the Andes, and valleys rich with endemics. Alvaro Jaramillo has been involved in a large project with National Audubon over the last couple of years that aims to promote conservation through economic development. How? Well, by creating the infrastructure and guide training to increase birding tourism in the area. When people earn a living from birding, they will preserve the birds and habitat. Come learn about this innovative program, and discover the richness of birds and birding in Colombia.

Monterey Audubon's Monthly Lectures and Programs Occur at the PG Museum of Natural History on Forest Avenue in Pacific Grove. Doors open for refreshments and socializing at 700pm. Our programs begin at app. 7:30. Monterey Audubon's Board Meetings are also open to the general membership and begin at 6:00pm, before the presentation.

  Professor Joe Morlan, one of California's leading bird authorities

Professor Joe Morlan, one of California's leading bird authorities

TUES. AUGUST 14, LECTURE: Convincing Details and Other Birding Fiction with Prof. Joe Morlan. As a birder, expanding our scientific understanding of which birds occur where and when requires a degree of advocacy, "I saw this thing, and I can prove it." Many articles have been published detailing how to write convincing bird descriptions, but who are we trying to convince?  How many of those details are remembered correctly and how many are a product of wishful embellishment? Are we convincing a records committee, an eBird reviewer, or maybe we are trying to convince ourselves? Joe Morlan will discuss how to prepare bird descriptions while exploring the importance of integrity in birding. He will include a brief history of scientific and ornithological fraud in what promises to be an informative and entertaining presentation. Joe Morlan has taught field ornithology at City College of San Francisco since 1978. He is the coauthor of "Birds of San Francisco and the Bay Area"and "Birds of Northern California." He has served as Chair of the California Bird Records Committee and was the recipient of the 2010 ABA Ludlow Griscom Award for contributions to regional ornithology. (For more on the legend of Joe Morlan visit the San Jose Mercury News, hereMonterey Audubon's Monthly Lectures and Programs Occur at the PG Museum of Natural History on Forest Avenue in Pacific Grove. Doors open for refreshments and socializing at 700pm. Our programs begin at app. 7:30. Monterey Audubon's Board Meetings are also open to the general membership and begin at 6:00pm, before the presentation.

TUES. SEPTEMBER 11, LECTURE: The Tricolored Blackbird new hope for an endangered, near-endemic California species? With Samantha Arthur. One of California's most endangered and iconic bird species may have recently received a reprieve from extinction thanks to its recent listing under the California Endangered Species Act. Join California Audubon Conservation Director (and former BSLT biologist) Samantha Arthur for an important update on one of our most important Birds. 

 A Tricolored Blackbird (male) visiting a working dairy near Moss Landing. Photo by Blake Matheson.

A Tricolored Blackbird (male) visiting a working dairy near Moss Landing. Photo by Blake Matheson.